What Happens When Students Pray

We recently chatted with Tamsyn Radmall who oversees the student ministry at Central Church in Edinburgh. Central has seen ten students give their lives to Christ since September and are discipling several more who had previously encountered Jesus on their own and stumbled into the church looking for some guidance on this new journey they had begun.
Tamsyn believes that prayer is at the foundation of it all and shares these stories as an example of what God has been doing through prayer in the lives of students.

“Prayer has become such a powerful part of the student ministry here at Central. Prayer has become more than petitioning God for certain things within the Christian community alone, but it has become a way in which God is calling people into relationship with Him.

Two different students recently tried out prayer and met Holy Spirit in it, subsequently giving their lives to Him.
One of the two girls tried out prayer because she was attempting to pray without God involved in it. She wanted to prove that atheists can use prayer as part of their atheist beliefs, without God. But instead of proving that you can pray without God involved, she ended up meeting Holy Spirit and coming to know God.
Another girl heard about prayer and simply thought she should try it out and then met God in it.

Two other girls, who at the time didn’t yet know Jesus, went up for prayer at church and had prophetic words given to them. Those prophetic words were on point and this helped them both to realise that God was real, was for them, that He speaks today and He is interested in speaking to them personally. Their response was to give their lives to God.”

We think God loves students and we are blown away by what He is doing in the lives of these young people!

If you work with students or are a student yourself, then 24-7 Prayer would love to resource and encourage you. Check out 24-7prayer.com/students for free prayer resources, a student blog and student events, among other things.

Following Jesus

Sam Rae from Aberdeen shares with us the impact that quality discipleship while living in authentic community has had on his life. He is currently working as the Youth & Children’s Intern at Emmaus Rd in Guildford.

At one point or another we all have to make choices that we don’t feel ready to make. Whether it’s what sandwich you want for lunch or what to do when you leave school – making choices can be stressful.

When I was deciding what to do upon finishing school, it felt like I was being pulled in a hundred different directions – go to university, study this, study that, apply for an apprenticeship. It felt like whatever decision I ended up making would have a major impact on the rest of my life.

Throughout the whole process I was desperate to follow God’s plan, yet it felt like He had left me high and dry in my time of need. I was stressed out and everyone around me knew it. I was told again and again “God will reveal His plan to you piece by piece” but it felt like God wasn’t giving anything away.
University deadlines were just around the corner and to say I was feeling stressed was an understatement. It was in the peak of my stress that I came across this quote,
It doesn’t matter which side of the fence you get off on sometimes. What matters most is getting off. You cannot make progress without making decisions.” —Jim Rohn

This quote freed me to make a decision and to stop worrying about which specific direction God wanted me to take. God goes with us wherever we go. Whichever choice I made, God was going to come with me.

I chose to take a gap year. As cliché as it may sound, I wanted to devote my year to finding God and discovering my identity in Christ. Nowadays there are so many different gap year programmes that help people do exactly that but I chose to do 24-7 Prayer’s The Vision Course.

It claimed to be “5 months of radical discipleship and personal growth – laying foundations of biblical knowledge, cross-cultural mission, character development and, of course, prayer.” And that’s exactly what it did.

I grew more in that 5 months on the course than I ever had before. I was learning about authentic community first-hand; being loved and cared for by people desperate to see me grow. I was being stretched more than I thought possible. I was giving my time and talents to God. And learning to truly lean on Him gave me a confidence that people had never seen in me before. The saying ‘God doesn’t call the equipped, He equips the called’ is true and my life is a testimony to that.

Growing in our knowledge and understanding of God’s Word allowed us as students to follow Him with a greater passion whilst also laying a solid foundation of basic theology.

I would urge anyone reading this that if you want to grow more than you have ever before and be championed by some amazing leaders then check out THE VISION COURSE.

Balance in busy-ness

Students have a tendency to cram. I say this as one who has often found himself on next to no sleep in a brave last-minute attempt to try and finish off some piece of coursework due the next day. But when I say “cram”, I mean more than just the usual night-before emergency revision session.
Timetables full of academic activities including but not limited to lectures, seminars, tutorials and self-directed study. The rest of our time is engaged with the social life that equally defines what ‘studying’ at university is all about – parties, pints, lunches, brunches, hang-outs, night-outs – an endless barrage of activity that can make even the most gregarious of extroverts wince a little inside. And even those of us who align ourselves more with the introvert end of the spectrum can often find joy in the busyness.

There is a risk, however, to equate busyness with usefulness. Whether we are supporting those who are closest to us or making good use of our time by completing tasks, life can take on…well…a life of its own.
The real danger is that our faith can become inextricably tied up with ‘doing’ and that, I daresay, can be found particularly in Christian student communities. It’s not long before the regular gatherings, socials, prayer meetings and outreach events can start to wear us down if we haven’t figured out a healthy spiritual balance in our lives. Even friendship evangelism that is meant to stem from a natural overflow of love can become contrived. Our one-on-one time with the Father gets relegated to the thing we ‘do’ in order to ‘do’ all the other things of life, rather than being the Source and focus of each day.

For me personally, “New Monasticism” is positively counter-cultural to the fast-moving society around us, especially within the bustling student universe.

Creating space and giving ourselves permission to reflect, contemplate and to just ‘be’ with Jesus is imperative to running the race set before us.

I find that following a daily rhythm of prayer isn’t another thing to add to my To-Do List but is instead what my To-Do List is structured around. It’s in those scheduled moments of prayer I get the chance to catch my breath, refresh in the Father’s love, and realign with His purposes before diving back into work again.
It is partly a disciplinary process as well. So even though sometimes during these check-ins with God I may not ‘feel’ or ‘hear’ anything from Him, I choose to believe that He is present with me. This then fuels me the rest of my day.

These appointed times are then not something I need to get ‘right’ but instead they serve as reminders to me that Christ’s grace is a constant flow that is well and truly sufficient.

My prayer and hope for my generation is that we know more of the gentle loving-kindness of God through the gift of His son Jesus, where our identity is ultimately found, and that nothing else is worth more than living life with Him.
To finish, a quote from the Philokalia that I came across recently sums things up aptly: “Stillness is not simply silence but an attitude of listening to God and of openness towards Him”. So although God didn’t necessarily create all of us to be deep-thinking contemplatives nor calls many to live as modern-day monks, each and every one of us is greeted with the friendly whisper from our Daddy in Heaven to “Be still and know that I am Lord”.

This was written by student Grant Holden who is studying Animation at Edinburgh College of Art. He attends St Paul’s & St George’s Church where he can sometimes be found boogieing when playing electric guitar during worship. He is passionate about the arts being combined with Kingdom values and has a heart to see contemplative prayer embedded more within society.